making aprons

I’m thinking about making a ruffle apron sometime soon, but until then here are some aprons I made last year. These were the last projects I was able to finish before my sewing machine started acting up and I switched over to knitting and crocheting for the rest of 2011.

I bought this McCall’s apron pattern when it went on sale for $0.99 at Hobby Lobby. My brother’s fiancée, Jess, (now my sister-in-law) had a birthday coming up and I decided to make her some kitchen stuff since they had moved into a new place just a few months before. I chose view C with pockets and made two oven mitts to match. I used a blue and white plaid thrifted sheet for the main fabric, plain white for the ties and two layers of Warm and Natural batting to line the mitts. Turning and quilting the mitts was the most challenging part because they were so thick and the curve between the mitt and the thumb was very strange to work with. Instead of using a piece of bias tape for the loops, I used some white rick-rack I had.

This was the “I’m about to mail this and should have taken a pic” photo from my phone.

Jess liked it, which was the most important thing. When my mom was visiting them not long ago, she said she thought they were store-bought! Since she’s the one who taught me everything I know, I was quite proud.

The next apron was also made from the same pattern, but I used view A. Crystal had sent me a picture of something that was this purple/pink combo and it inspired me to make an apron in those same shades.

Another last-minute phone pic. I added some purple flower printed rick-rack and buttons to up the whimsy factor. The fabric was the inexhaustible pink sheet and purple curtain leftovers.

I moved from the patterns to a tutorial I found for a reversible apron to make some aprons for my cousins, Rebecca and Elizabeth. I’d bought some fun printed remnants at Hobby Lobby and had enough fabric there to make a couple of aprons. I wanted aprons that would go together, but not be exactly the same.

I used the pink sheet as one side for both aprons to give them something in common. I used a circle print for Elizabeth’s and a multi-colored flower and butterfly print for Rebecca’s. I wanted to be able to see both fabrics on either side, so I added a strip from each opposite side at both of the bottoms. I left off the pockets and used ribbon instead of making the ties from fabric. I found a coordinating textured ribbon for the circles, and the other fabric had a silky ribbon that matched exactly. The circle ribbon just happened to have this great green color on the back. The silky ribbon didn’t have a pretty back, so I sewed strips together back-to-back so it would be reversible too.

You can see the print on Rebecca’s a little bit here. She was baking something in her Hello Kitty baker and my aunt sent me this pic. Since I live pretty far away from all of my family, I appreciate when they send me “customer appreciation” photos.

And here’s another “customer appreciation” photo of Elizabeth, my aunt Barbara (whose apron I am about to tell you about), and my cousin and godchild Anthony (whose apron I did not make) cooking on Thanksgiving.

My aunt’s apron was also made from a thrifted sheet. I liked the contrasting border so I left that as it was and cut out the apron using a basic apron I already had as a pattern. Because I was using a sheet, I was able to cut a long strip to use as the tie. I cut two additional pieces from the sheet to go along to the top two sides. I sewed them on the back of the apron to make a place to thread the neck and waist ties through. The tie starts on one end, goes all the way up one side, around the neck, and comes down the other side to tie in the back. I hope you were able to understand that last sentence because descriptive words were failing me there.

Phew, well those are all the aprons I’ve made for now. Maybe there will be a ruffled apron to post about in the next couple of weeks!

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